Our Work Where Central Kalimantan

Central Kalimantan

The province of Central Kalimantan, located in the Indonesian part of Borneo, is one of the largest provinces in Indonesia. The province is home to charismatic fauna such as the orangutan, proboscis monkey and sun bears that live among the biologically diverse forests and peat swamps. The people of Central Kalimantan are diverse too: the indigenous Dayak live among the Banjarese and more recent migrants from other parts of Indonesia. Over recent decades, the province has developed rapidly, large due the expansion of commercial agriculture and exploitation of natural resources. Economic development, however, has often come at the expense of the natural environment. Forests and peat land have converted to farmland leading to the loss of biological diversity and habitat for animals, and increased emissions of greenhouse gases. Is there a way that economic development in Central Kalimantan does not lead to the degradation of the natural environment, while benefitting the poor and respecting the rights of indigenous people?

Since 2012, Institut Penelitian Inovasi Bumi (INOBU) and Earth Innovation Institute (EII) have been working with the provincial government of Central Kalimantan to ensure that the cultivation of oil palm is sustainable, equitable and recognises the rights of indigenous people. Together, we supported the creation of the “Central Kalimantan Roadmap to Low-Deforestation Rural Development.” Working in two districts, Kotawaringin Barat and Seruyan, we are working with the district governments to pilot jurisdiction level certification of the production of palm oil. These activities have involved mapping the lands of smallholder oil palm farmers and supporting the registration of their lands, establishing working groups between government and agribusinesses, and developing a plantation monitoring system. The two districts have also been selected as pilot sites for the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) initiative for jurisdictional certification.

The pilot initiatives need the support of the private sector, national government and international community to move forward and expand to other districts. We will work together with the private sector to support initiatives to purchase palm oil from districts certified as being sustainable. Support from the national government is needed to recognise the initiatives of these districts, validate their monitoring systems and support the design of mechanisms to incentivise initiatives for sustainability. We also need support from the international community to fund incentive mechanisms and expand the initiatives to other districts in Central Kalimantan and beyond.

Throughout the year, we host many events, some of which are open to the general public.

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The New Local Government Law

In September 2014, the Indonesian government enacted the new Local Government Law, Law No. 23/2014 that replaced the old Local Government Law, Law No. 32/2004. Although it recentralizes some authority back to the central level, the new law provides clearer guidance related to the distribution of governmental functions between the central and local governments. This article summarizes the legal analysis of the old and new Local Government Laws. Specifically, this article will analyze the shift of authority and distribution of governmental functions among the central, provincial, and district governments, especially with regards to land-based sectors, including forestry, land, agriculture, and spatial planning.

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How can REDD+ protect the rights of West Papuans and the environment?

The Indonesian central government recently announced economic development as a national priority in West Papua. With commercial interests set to expand, there is an urgent need to implement land-use management systems that safeguard the welfare and rights of indigenous people and their natural environment in the province.

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Intergovernmental Fiscal Transfers, Forest Conservation and Climate Change

Intergovernmental fiscal transfers (IFTs) are an innovative way to create incentives for local public actors to support conservation. This book contributes to the debate about how to conserve tropical forests by implementing mechanisms for reducing deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+).

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